Peanuts in Canada

peanuts in CanadaPeanuts and peanut butter are popular in Canada. According to a 2022 survey of Canadian consumers, 95% eat peanuts and 93% eat peanut butter; 86% of households have peanut butter on-hand. The average Canadian eats nearly 3 kg of peanuts per year!

Canada is the largest single-country importer of U.S. peanuts. More than 85 per cent of the peanuts consumed in Canada are obtained from a choice of 25,000 growers from the United States.

The Canadian climate isn't very conducive to growing peanuts, which require sandy soil and hot dry weather. The total amount of peanuts farmed in Canada may be as small as a couple hundred tonnes – compared to shipments of all U.S. peanut products to Canada at 127,465 metric tonnes in 2019. 


2021 Canadian Peanut Consumption Data

Erickson Research, January 2022 

  • Overall peanut consumption stayed consistent at 95% in 2021
  • Overall peanut butter consumption in Canadian households remains high year-over-year, at 93%
  • 63% of Canadians report heavy peanut butter consumption (at least once per week), up from 60% in 2020
  • Nearly all Canadian households consume peanuts:
    • 95% of households eat peanuts at least every few months
    • 40% eat peanuts at least once per week
    • 55% of households have peanuts on-hand
  • Nearly all Canadian households consume peanut butter:
    • 93% of households consume peanut butter at least every few months
    • 63% eat peanut butter at least once per week
    • 86% of households have peanut butter on-hand
    • 79% say peanut butter is a staple in their pantry
  • Of those Canadians who eat peanuts, 16% consume them in the morning, 64% in the afternoon, 13% at dinner and 49% in the evening
    • 18- to 34-year-olds are more likely than other age groups to eat peanuts in the morning (24%)
    • 35- to 54-year-olds are more likely than other age groups to eat peanuts in the afternoon (69%)
    • Those 55 and older are the most likely to eat peanuts in late evening (58%)
  • The preferred time to eat peanut butter is at breakfast (63%), followed by snacks (41%), lunch (39%) and dinner (12%)
    • 18- to 34-year-olds are more likely than other age groups to eat peanut butter in the morning (71%)
    • 35- to 54-year-olds are more likely than other age groups to eat peanut butter at lunch (42%)
    • Those 55 and older are the most likely to eat peanut butter as a snack (46%)
  • Residents in Quebec are less likely to eat peanut butter at least once per week (54%) than the rest of Canada (65%)
  • 73% of Canadians usually eat peanut butter spread on bread, toast or baked snacks (including crackers, bagels, English muffins, etc.), making it the most preferred consumption method
  • Over a quarter of Canadians (26%) say they consume peanut butter on its own, right out of the jar
  • 65% of Canadians regularly snack on peanuts, making them the second most preferred snack food, after chips (71%)
  • 1 in 5 Canadians (20%) prefer peanuts over all other snacks
  • When snacking, 71% of Canadians usually eat peanuts salted, and 55% eat peanuts in mixed nut snacks, making these the most preferred formats
  • Canadians think peanuts (89%) and peanut butter (85%) are good snacks for both adults and children
  • Canadians think peanuts (72%) and peanut butter (73%) are good ingredients for cooking and/or baking
    • 44% frequently use peanut butter as an ingredient in cooking and/or baking, up from 42% in 2020
    • 29% frequently use peanuts in their meals, up from 26% in 2020
  • 91% of Canadians think peanuts and peanut butter are healthy/nutritious
  • Canadians think peanuts (82%) and peanut butter (84%) satisfy hunger
  • During the COVID-19 pandemic, peanut and peanut butter consumption increased amongst 17% and 16% of Canadians, respectively
  • 42% of Canadians believe that introducing and regularly feeding common food allergens, like peanut protein, to babies by around 6 months of age, but not before 4 months, can help prevent food allergy

 


 
The popularity of the peanut can be traced back to George Washington Carver, the American botanist who found more than 300 uses for it.